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The Danger of Kaho’olawe

Kaho’olawe was once a flourishing paradise for seabirds and native flora but the introduction of ranching and the use of the island as military bombing target practice drastically altered the island ecosystem.

After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 Kaho’olawe was transformed into a bombing range that prepared troops for World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and Desert Storm. The island was scattered with bomb fragments and the soil left barren.

Activists worked for decades to have the island returned to the Hawi’ian State government. Occupying the island and writing to government officials trying to make a change and stop the bombing. In 1994 the sacred island was returned to the state and placed under control of Kaho‘olawe Island Reserve Commission (KIRC). Now Island Conservation and our partners are working to restore the island and revive the native species that once thrived there.

In case you missed the first part of the series.

Watch the video from Hawaii News Now to learn more.
Featured Photo: Remnants of military bombing practice on Kaho’olawe. Credit: Oliver Langrand

About Emily Heber

Emily is a recent graduate from UC Santa Barbara with a BS in Zoology. As a student, she discovered that she had a passion for the conservation of endangered species and their ecosystems. Her background in informal education has allowed her the opportunity to share her passion for animals with others, something she seeks to continue doing while working with the communication team. In her spare time, Emily enjoys exploring the amazing hiking trails found in Santa Cruz and tries to SCUBA dive whenever possible. Emily is excited to join the Island Conservation team and to help share the amazing work that is being done here.

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