ADVISORY COUNCIL

  • Don Croll
    Don Croll
  • Jon Hoekstra
    Jon Hoekstra
  • Nick Holmes
    Nick Holmes
  • Olivier Langrand
    Olivier Langrand
  • John Mitchell
    John Mitchell
  • Susan Packard Orr
    Susan Packard Orr
  • Ryan Phelan
    Ryan Phelan
  • Stan Rowland
    Stan Rowland
  • Michael Sutton
    Michael Sutton
  • Bernie Tershy, Ph.D.
    Bernie Tershy, Ph.D.
  • Eric VanderWerf
    Eric VanderWerf
  • Alex Wegmann
    Alex Wegmann
  • Andy Wright
    Andy Wright
  • Lindsay Young
    Lindsay Young

ADVISORY COUNCIL – FOUNDING MEMBERS

Don Croll

Don Croll is a Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UC Santa Cruz, Co-founder of Island Conservation, founding partner and Science Director of the conservation for-profit Conservation Metrics, Inc., Faculty Director of the UCSC Natural Reserve System, and a National Geographic Fellow. He has conducted conservation research on island ecosystems and marine vertebrates for over 30 years and published over 100 papers and articles on the conservation and ecology of marine species and island ecosystems. As a professor, he has been dedicated to developing the research programs, courses, and graduate training needed for direct conservation action. Early in his career, he won the Audubon Conservation award for his conservation research in California fisheries bycatch leading to the closure of a coastal California gill-net fishery. In 2006, he led a unique coalition of academics, conservationists, politicians, and fishermen that resulted in the US Pacific Fishery Management Council adopting a ban on commercial fishing for krill in federal waters in recognition of its vital importance to marine food webs. He has trained over 600 undergraduates and 17 graduate and postdoctoral students in marine conservation, conservation biology, and field methods in conservation. Don received his B.S.in biology from UC Davis, M.S. from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and a Ph.D. from UC San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is currently the Robert Headley Presidential Chair for Integral Ecology and Environmental Justice.

 

Jon Hoekstra

Jon, a former Island Conservation Board member, leads the Greenway as Executive Director, working with the Board of Directors, staff, and partners to collaboratively conserve the Mountains to Sound Greenway landscape. Jon brings to the Greenway a unique blend of scientific understanding, strategic problem solving and communication skills. Before joining the Greenway Trust, he served as Chief Scientist for the World Wildlife Fund, and led a variety of strategy and conservation initiatives at The Nature Conservancy. While Jon enjoys traveling around the world to explore wild places, he always loves coming back home to Seattle and the Greenway landscape that he and his wife have called home for 20 years.

Nick Holmes

Nick Holmes’ career and passion focus on research program management and conservation ecology. He earned his PhD from the University of Tasmania, Australia, working with the Australian Antarctic Division to develop best-practice guidelines for managing human impacts to seabirds in the subantarctic. Nick managed the Kaua‘i Endangered Seabird Recovery Project at the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawai‘i, developing and implementing recovery actions for Newell’s Shearwaters, Hawai‘ian Petrels and Band-rumped Storm-petrels. He served as Island Conservation’s director of science for eight years with a background in research and management expertise in seabirds, population modeling, endangered species recovery, environmental impact assessment, human-wildlife interactions, and monitoring programs. His experience includes a strong focus on island conservation and ecology, including time spent living and working on islands in the subantarctic, Antarctica, Hawai‘i, and Australia. His professional goal is facilitating practical conservation outcomes based on sound science.

Olivier Langrand

With 27 years of experience in international conservation, Olivier is an expert on environmental policy and governmental sector engagement as well as the implementation and coordination of on-the-ground conservation projects. Olivier joined the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) in 2015 as executive director. CEPF is a fund dedicated to conserve the most biologically, yet threatened, ecosystems – the world’s biodiversity hotspots – through the action of civil society groups. Prior to joining CEPF, Olivier worked as the director of global affairs for Island Conservation where he spent three years working on the international policy framework and the public funding stream necessary for governments and NGO partners to prevent species extinction from islands. Before working for Island Conservation, Olivier spent eleven years with Conservation International, where he served as Executive Vice President in charge of the Center for Conservation and Government. His division was responsible for public funding, engaging with governments and multi-lateral institutions in environmental policy, and working with indigenous and traditional peoples.

In his previous position with Conservation International, Olivier led the Africa and Madagascar Division. Prior to joining CI, Olivier held similar positions in Madagascar and Central Africa with World Wildlife Fund where he worked for 14 years. Over the course of his career, of which seventeen have been spent in the field in various countries of Africa, Olivier has developed a wealth of experience and global relationships in support of his lifelong passion and commitment to protecting biodiversity. Olivier received his Masters of Science (MSc) from the Department of Zoology at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He is an avid birder, an expert on the birds of southwestern Indian Ocean islands, and author and/or co-author of over 100 scientific publications, including three authoritative books on the avifauna of Madagascar, the Comoros, the Mascarenes, and the Seychelles Islands.

John Mitchell

John Mitchell, Honorary Curator, Institute of Systematic Botany

John Mitchell, a former Island Conservation Board member, is an Adjunct Scientist at the New York Botanical Garden and Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History. He serves as the Chairman of the Board at the Rainforest Trust and is on the Board of Directors (former Chairman) of Bat Conservation International and of the Turtle Survival Alliance. He is the former Executive Secretary and Chairman of the Beneficia Foundation. John belongs to a wide variety of scientific and environmental organizations and has special interests in conservation and birding, having pursued these activities worldwide from the Antarctic and Africa to Borneo and South America. He is a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London and a member of the Explorers Club. He has a B.S. in biology from Muhlenberg College and pursued Ph.D. studies in ecology at Rutgers University. He has authored and co-authored many scientific papers, publications, and books dealing with tropical vegetation, tropical tree identification, and the taxonomy of the Cashew–Poison Ivy family.

Susan Packard Orr

Susan Packard Orr is co- founder and Chairman of Arreva LLC, a company started in 1986 to provide fundraising and other software to nonprofit organizations.

She currently serves as a trustee of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the National Audubon Society, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and the Packard Humanities Institute. In addition she chairs the Global Advisory Group for BirdLife International.

Susan holds an M.S. in computer science from New Mexico Tech, and an M.B.A. and B.A. in economics from Stanford University. She and her husband, Lynn, reside on the Stanford campus where Lynn is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. They have two children and four grandchildren. Susan is an avid birder and loves to travel in search of nature’s beauty.

 

 

Ryan Phelan

Ryan Phelan is Co-founder and Executive Director of Revive & Restore, a nonprofit organization with a mission to enhance biodiversity through the genetic rescue of endangered and extinct species. Ryan works with some of the world’s leading molecular biologists, conservation biologists, and conservation organizations to develop pioneering genetic rescue projects. The goal is to use cutting-edge genomic technologies to solve previously intractable wildlife conservation challengers such as those posed by inbreeding, exotic diseases, climate change, and destructive invasive species.

Revive & Restore’s current projects range from the development of genomic tools to overcome specific conservation challenges to the advancement of the genetic rescue platform as a new toolkit for conservation. She recently raised a $3.5 Million Catalyst Science Fund to enable cutting-edge research that could transform conservation practice.

Since the inception of Revive & Restore in 2012, Ryan has brought together diverse groups of scientists and conservation practitioners in a series of meetings and workshops to advance the field of genetic rescue. The first of these was the 2013 TedXDeExtinction meeting, which explored the idea of reviving extinct species and re-introducing them to the wild. For the 2016 IUCN World Conservation Congress, she organized the first significant workshop on genetic rescue, with both a public and a private event. In 2017, in partnership with Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Ryan organized the “Engineering Resilience” workshop, which was modelled on Revive & Restore’s highly successfully “New Genomic Solutions for Conservation” workshop in 2015.

Ryan is a serial entrepreneur, active in both the for-profit and nonprofit worlds. She was the founder and CEO of two innovative healthcare companies: DNA Direct, the first medical genetics company to focus on bringing personalized medicine to the consumer, and Direct Medical Knowledge, a consumer health web site unique for its content depth and innovative search interface.

Ryan is also the President of Revive & Restore’s Board of Directors.

Stan Rowland

Stan Rowland is Chairman and President of Tetiaroa Society, an environmental NGO based on the atoll of Tetiaroa in French Polynesia. Tetiaroa Society sponsors scientific research on issues ranging from ocean acidification and coral bleaching to shark research and mosquito control, manages island and ocean conservation projects, and runs an educational program for local schoolchildren about sustainability, modern science, traditional wisdom and Polynesian culture.

Stan also works as an adviser to Pacific Beachcomber S.C., which owns and manages several operations in French Polynesia including The Brando resort on Tetiaroa which has established new standards in sustainability with deep sea water air conditioning, carbon neutral operations and innovative environmental programs that it seeks to promote world-wide.

Before focusing his work in French Polynesia, Stan was a partner in the San Francisco-based law firms Allen Matkins and Pillsbury and the Managing Partner of the Hong Kong offices of both Pillsbury and Thelen. Stan is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley (Economics) and Cornell Law School.

Michael Sutton

Mike is a respected environmental conservation leader with extensive experience managing nonprofit organizations, influencing public policy, advocating for natural resources, and guiding successful philanthropic efforts. His distinguished career has ranged from work with the National Park Service to senior conservation roles at the World Wildlife Fund, the David & Lucile Packard Foundation, the California Fish & Game Commission, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Audubon Society. Mike received his BS in Wildlife Biology at Utah State University; did graduate studies in Marine Biology at the University of Sydney, Australia; and, received a law degree with honors from George Washington University’s National Law Center. He joined the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2018 as Executive Director.

Bernie Tershy, Ph.D.

Bernie is a co-founder of Island Conservation and an Adjunct Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz, where he co-directs the Conservation Action Lab. Bernie is also co-founder and Board Chair of Conservation Metrics, a for-profit social venture dedicated to improving conservation through better monitoring, and co-founder of Freshwater Life, which saves endangered freshwater species by eradicating freshwater invasives. He is a member of the IUCN’s Invasive Species Specialist Group and Commission on Ecosystem Management. Bernie serves as a consultant to the Mulago Foundation’s Henry Arnhold Fellows Program, and is on the boards of OneReef, Rainforest Trust, and the Tony Hawk Foundation. He earned his BS in Biology from UC-Santa Cruz, an MS in Marine Sciences from San Jose State University, and a PhD in neurobiology and behavior from Cornell University.

Eric VanderWerf

Eric VanderWerf earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Cornell University in 1988 and Master of Science degree from the University of Florida in 1992.  In 1999, he completed a Ph.D. at the University of Hawaii, where his research focused on plumage variation and effects of habitat disturbance and diseases on population biology of the Hawaii Elepaio. From 2000-2006, he worked on a variety of conservation and ornithological projects during stints with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Hawaii Division of Forestry and Wildlife.  Eric founded Pacific Rim Conservation in 2006 with the goal of conducting on the ground conservation work focused on Pacific Island birds and ecosystems. He currently serves as the Director of Science for Pacific Rim Conservation. Eric has authored over 120 scientific papers, book chapters, and technical reports.

Alex Wegmann

Alex Wegmann, PhD: A 20-year veteran of managing and advising conservation projects in the Pacific, Alex Wegmann became The Nature Conservancy’s Palmyra Program Director in 2016 and then the Director of Science for the Palmyra Program in 2019. Prior to joining the Conservancy, Alex worked for Island Conservation for more than 10 years. Alex’s tenure with IC started as an advisor to the Palmyra Atoll rat eradication project and ended as the organization’s U.S. Pacific Islands and Micronesia Program Manager. Alex holds a B.A. in anthropology from Linfield College and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Hawai‘i where his graduate research focused on terrestrial ecosystem response to invasive rats. Alex has experience in conservation projects across the pacific, including the Northwestern Hawai‘ian Islands, the Line Islands, Micronesia, Fiji, and Japan. His experience with Pacific Island ecosystems made him a valuable resource to many government and non-governmental conservation organizations, including: The US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the US Department of Defense, New Zealand’s Department of Conservation, Coastal Conservation, Pacific Rim Conservation, The Nature Conservancy, and Island Conservation.  In his current role, Alex leads a compelling, $5M conservation science initiative leveraging Palmyra Atoll’s unique ecological characteristics to address global conservation challenges.

 

Andy Wright

Founder and Executive Director, Willow Grove Foundation and Adjunct Professor, Pacific Water Research Centre

Andrew S. Wright is a former high technology entrepreneur and currently an adjunct professor at SFU in the Faculty of the Environment. Since 2007 he has actively engaged in promoting enhanced inner-city childhood education programs and ecological conservation efforts.  In addition to directly supporting the Great Bear Rainforest agreement via donation he has played a direct technical role in advancing land-based closed containment salmon aquaculture in BC.  The development of the Namgis Kuterra FinFish aquaculture farm is a direct result of these efforts. He is involved in a wide range of conservation endeavors and sits on the boards of various groups and initiatives. Additionally, he is a passionate conservation photographer and has produced two books, Emeralds at the Edge and Faltering Light, both arguing the case for increased conservation in British Columbia.

Lindsay Young

Lindsay Young is the Executive Director of Pacific Rim Conservation, a Hawaii based non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of endemic birds. She has a BS in Zoology from the University of British Columbia and an MS in Zoology from the University of Hawai`i. In 2009, she completed her Ph.D. at the University of Hawai`i where her research focused on the population genetics, at sea foraging ecology, and conservation needs of Laysan Albatross. Lindsay has worked on numerous conservation projects in Hawai`i and the Pacific region since 2003 with a variety of state, federal, and private partners. Lindsay has authored several dozen scientific papers, served as the treasurer for the Pacific Seabird Group, the chair of the North Pacific Albatross Working Group, is the former North Pacific correspondent for ACAP (Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels), and as a reviewer for multiple refereed journals. Lindsay was one of the 2011 recipients of the US Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Champion Awards for her work on the Nihoa Millerbird Translocation, and in 2016 she was awarded a special achievement award from the Pacific Seabird Group for her work with Hawaiian seabirds. She currently serves as an affiliate graduate faculty member at the University of Hawai`i Natural Resources and Environmental Management Department and

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Midway Atoll conservation